June 6th 2016 – Venus at superior solar conjunction

From our vantage point on the Earth, Venus will appear very close to the Sun in the sky as it passes around the far side of the solar system from the Earth.

At closest approach, Venus and the Sun will appear at a separation of only 0°00′, making Venus totally unobservable for several weeks while it is lost in the Sun’s glare.

Venus will also pass apogee – the time when it is most distant from the Earth – within a few days of the same time, since it will lie exactly opposite to the Earth in the Solar System. It will move to a distance of 1.74 AU from the Earth, making it appear small and very distant. If it could be observed, it would measure 9.6 arcsec in diameter, whilst appearing completely illuminated.

Venus’s reaching superior conjunction marks the end of its apparition in the morning sky and its transition to become an evening object over the next few weeks.

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Greek and Roman Gods vs. The Christian God

Many different religions are practiced around the world.  Some worship many gods and some worship the One True God.  The Greeks and Romans worshipped many gods.  Christians worship the One True God.  If we look at the Greek and Roman religions we can see many differences with Christianity.

In Greek and Roman culture there are many imaginary gods. Some even call them myths. The Greek and Roman gods were quite spiteful and jealous. And since they were that way, they often seemed unpredictable. The gods of Greek and Roman culture reproduced in extremely strange ways, and would even interact with mortals creating many demigods. The Greek and Roman gods each had their individual powers. For example, Mars was the god of war, Poseidon was the god of the sea and Athena was the god of wisdom. Many of the Greek and Roman gods had human-like tendencies and many times they were not the best example of good behavior.

 

  On the other hand, our Christian God is real, and is talked about alot in the Bible. Our God is merciful and kind, and reproduced spiritually. Our God knows everything about everyone, and he is all powerful. God is constant and dependable, we always know he will do the right thing. God is above the human experience and his ways are something to aspire to. God is a good role model. 

 

So we can see that the Greek and Roman gods are very different from the One True God.  The Greek and Roman gods are petty and spiteful and are not good role models.  The One True God of Christianity is the perfect role model.  Different versions of pantheism and Christianity exist now and will exist into the future.

 

The Big Dipper and The Little Dipper

Reproduced Verbatim from

 

Big and Little Dippers: Everything you need to know

The Big Dipper is easy. And, once you find it, you can find the Little Dipper, too. Plus … learn how the stars of the Big Dipper are moving in space.

A fixture of the northern sky, the Big and Little Dippers swing around the north star Polaris like riders on a Ferris wheel. They go full circle around Polaris once a day – or once every 23 hours and 56 minutes. If you live at temperate latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, simply look northward and chances are that you’ll see the Big Dipper in your nighttime sky. It looks just like its namesake. Once you’ve found the Big Dipper, it’s only a hop, skip and jump to Polaris and the Little Dipper. Follow the links below to learn more about the Big and Little Dippers.

 

A fixture of the northern sky, the Big and Little Dippers swing around the north star Polaris like riders on a Ferris wheel. They go full circle around Polaris once a day – or once every 23 hours and 56 minutes. If you live at temperate latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere, simply look northward and chances are that you’ll see the Big Dipper in your nighttime sky. It looks just like its namesake. Once you’ve found the Big Dipper, it’s only a hop, skip and jump to Polaris and the Little Dipper. Follow the links below to learn more about the Big and Little Dippers.

Define – Red Giant

A red giant is a luminous giant star of low or intermediate mass (roughly 0.3–8 solar masses  in a late phase of stellar evolution. The outer atmosphere is inflated and tenuous, making the radius large and the surface temperature low, 5,000 K and lower. The appearance of the red giant is from yellow-orange to red, including the spectral types K and M, but also class S stars and most carbon stars.

The most common red giants are stars on the red-giant branch  that are still fusing hydrogen into helium in a shell surrounding an inert helium core. Other red giants are the red-clump stars in the cool half of the horizontal branch, fusing helium into carbon in their cores via the triple-alpha process; and the asymptotic-giant-branch stars with a helium burning shell outside a degenerate carbon–oxygen core, and a hydrogen burning shell just beyond that.

Mars at opposition 5/22/2016

Mars will be well placed for observation, in the constellation Scorpius. It will be visible for much of the night, reaching its highest point in the sky at around midnight local time.

From Virginia, it will be visible between 20:51 and 05:03. It will become accessible at around 20:51, when it rises 7° above your south-eastern horizon, and then reach its highest point in the sky at 00:59, 31° above your southern horizon. It will become inaccessible at around 05:03 when it sinks to 8° above your south-western horizon.

Mars in coming weeks

Over the weeks following its opposition, Mars will reach its highest point in the sky four minutes earlier each night, gradually receding from the pre-dawn morning sky while remaining visible in the evening sky for a few months.

 

Taken verbatim from In-the-sky.org